Friday, November 10, 2017

Structuring Training

I'm a big believer in organized, focused, and mindful training. It's been my experience that I see more consistent meaningful progress when I train with goals and structure than just showing up. I've spoken about this before but lets discuss some specific tools we can use to help us.

"Learning how to learn is one of the keys to success in life in general, and jiu-jitsu in particular." 
-John Danaher

I know some people like to use a Mind Map to study their training. I personally like more of a Flow Chart structure.

My mind map attempts sometimes go a little off the rails


For example as a white belt one of my first flow charts looked something like this:
Closed Guard
>Overhook
>>Cross collar choke
>> Flower sweep > mount > cross collar choke
>>> Posture up > hip bump sweep > mount > cross collar choke
>>>> Post > kimua
>>>> Pressure in > guillotine 

To use something like this as a tool to direct my practice I would suggest focusing either getting to the start position or starting from position and then trying to execute the plan. As reactions and failures appear pay attention and fill in the gaps as they present.

For example lets say my hip bump to mount is straight fire..... but...... often when I mount my opponent they escape by executing a knee elbow escape. This highlights a hole in the system, and informs me of where I am weak. I can then speak to my coaches intelligently about a specific technical issue rather than just vague "How do I get better?" or "My mount sucks." The type of counter I see will inform where the flaw is.

Now, armed with this knowledge I can say ok, I've defined a weak spot, I can train open mat this Tuesday and try to start from mount, or schedule a private lesson where I have an idea of where the flaw is, and I can more clearly see when this spot approaches in a live roll and be more mindful and attentive to the details as the position evolves. 

In the shooting sports for example I found when walking my stages that often I would drop a shot wide on the last target in a array before a movement. By being mindful and reviewing video I was able to see that I was not staying in position until the shot broke but would start to move and break my eyes as the shot broke. This is why I could never call those shots, I was leaving early and would drop an uncalled D zone hit on a wide open target usually laterally. With this information I could structure some focused training on this specific issue and isolate the skill in drills.

Often this will also reveal counters. As I pay attention perhaps I will see that all the upper belts do a specific counter to my plan, or otherwise deny me a control that's a prerequisite for the technique to work. Often times I see the newer practitioner write a move off, claim it wont work for their body type, or otherwise disregard a technique due to initial failures. The flower sweep was like this for me. As a new white belt I recall being in a tournament and attempting it over and over again as I gassed out and was cursing myself ever aware of my team mates watching, my wife, the video being taken, and I just failed and failed. Surely this technique just wouldn't work for me! My hips aren't right! I'm not fast enough! It wasn't until years later that I hit one at open mat and realized all this time I just wasn't getting the right angle! Had I not disregarded what is a pretty common fundamental sweep so early on I could have had years more of reps improving on it and improving my overall understanding of jiu-jitsu. Lost opportunity.

As a good general rule, if its in the fundamentals curriculum trust the technique and try to get all the details correct over a period of time. Like a long period of time. Like years.

I have normally 3 dedicated 1-2 hour drilling sessions a week. Currently I am working on a Single Leg X passing strategy, a back take from scorpion hook that needs added to an already developed series, and tuning up some details on my knee cut pass. I also do one dedicated session working on take downs. Add to this several classes and open mats and the schedule fills up pretty quick!

It's up to me to take responsibility for my progress. Even if I do occasionally get the gift of someone pointing out a flaw, or highlighting a strength, they aren't there all the time. They wont be there whispering in my ear at open mat "don't forget to work on your back take" , they wont be waking me up an hour early to lift weights, they wont be popping into my living room and forcing me to dry fire or watch videos. It's on me. It's always on me. It's ok if I want to just relax and have fun for a little while, I'm not a professional athlete, but when its time to improve then its time to go to work!

Shawn Lupka




No comments:

Post a Comment